Quiz 

Anesthesia & Analgesia in Reptiles Course Post Test

The Reptile Anesthesia and Analgesia webinar was reviewed and approved by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB) Registry of Approved Continuing Education (R.A.C.E.) program for 1 hour of continuing education, in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB R.A.C.E. approval…

Article  Webinar 

Spotlight on Anesthesia & Analgesia in Reptiles

This live webinar event was presented by Javier Nevarez, DVM, PhD, DACZM, DECZM (Herpetology). View a recording of Dr. Nevarez’s web-based seminar and earn 1 hour of R.A.C.E.-approved continuing education credit. Lecture objectives include a review of the principles and concepts of reptile analgesia, recommended analgesics, signs of pain and pain recognition, and a review of analgesic protocols. The presentation also reviews principles and concepts of reptile anesthesia, popular anesthetic agents and anesthetic protocols, monitoring, as well as keys to success.

Javier Nevarez, DVM, PhD, DACZM, DECZM (Herpetology)

Javier G. Nevarez obtained his Bachelor of Science with an emphasis in animal science in 1998, his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine in 2001, and a PhD in 2007, all from Louisiana State University. In 2002, he completed an internship in zoological medicine at the Louisiana State University of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM). Dr. Nevarez became a Diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine and the European College of Zoological Medicine (Herpetology) in 2011. He has been a faculty member of the Zoological Medicine service at LSU SVM since 2003, where he also serves as director of the Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana.

Article 

A Guide to Esophagostomy Tube Placement in Chelonians

The use of esophagostomy tubes (E-tubes) allows administration of oral medications and critical care nutrition to turtles and tortoises while minimizing stress and the risk of esophageal trauma associated with repeated rigid gavage tube feeding. Esophagostomy tubes are very well tolerated in chelonians and the patient can even eat normally with the tube in place. Patients can be medicated and fed on an outpatient basis, and once fully recovered, the E-tube is easily removed in the veterinary clinic.