Article  Webinar 

Emergency and Critical Care of Rabbits

Save the date

Save the Date for a R.A.C.E.-approved continuing education webinar

Presenter:  Charly Pignon, DVM, DECZM (Small Mammal)

Date: Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Time: 1 pm EST; What time is that in my time zone?

Registration opens October 23, 2018

Lecture outline

Lecture topics will include:

  • Emergency triage
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Analgesia
    • Opioids
    • Anti-inflammatories
    • Co-analgesics
  • Fluid therapy
    • Deficit correction
    • Rehydration
    • Maintenance
  • Critical care nutrition

 

Abstract

Intensive care in rabbits requires a thorough knowledge of rabbit […]

Article  Information sheet 

Basic Information Sheet: Virginia Opossum

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AEMV-Lafeber Case Report: Endometrial Venous Aneurysm in a Lionhead Rabbit

A 1-year-old female intact lionhead rabbit was referred for a history of hematuria, bloody vaginal discharge, anorexia, and lethargy unresponsive to antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications. Based upon physical examination, radiographs and abdominal ultrasonography a uterine mass was suspected. Severe regenerative anemia secondary to blood loss was diagnosed and the rabbit was administered a whole blood transfusion prior to surgical intervention. Abdominal exploratory with ovariohysterectomy revealed…

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Even the most steadfast and seasoned veterinary anesthetist can find themselves intimidated by exotic animal patients. Standard veterinary anesthesia monitors are not designed to read the extremely high (or extremely low) heart rates and respiratory rates of some exotic animal patients. Despite these challenges, valuable information can be gathered from monitoring tools as well as hands-on techniques. Essential vital signs, such as heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate and depth, body temperature, and mucous membrane color should all be evaluated.

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Blood Pressure Monitoring in Exotic Animal Species

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Article 

Electrocardiography in Exotic Animal Species

Electrocardiography can be used to detect and diagnose arrhythmias and conduction abnormalities, particularly during long-term anesthesia. How are leads attached to exotic animal patients? And what is the normal appearance of normal electrocardiogram tracings in birds or reptiles?

Article 

Pulse Oximetry in Exotic Animal Species

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Guinea Pig Reproduction Basics

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Behavior Essentials: Clinical Approach to the Guinea Pig

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Client Education Handout 

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Proper management of the pregnant sow requires an understanding of the risk factors associated with pregnancy-related disease and an ability to recognize early signs of problems. This client education handout explains proper care of the breeding and pregnant sow and provides tips for careful monitoring. Download the PDF version to distribute to veterinary clients or modify the Word document for your hospital’s needs.

Article  Teaching Module 

Emergency and Critical Care Teaching Module

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Article 

Analgesia and Sedation in Exotic Companion Mammals

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Article  Client Education Handout 

Emergency Preparedness Plan for Exotic Pets

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A Guide to Nasotracheal Intubation in Rabbits

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Article  Presenting Problem 

Presenting Problem: Dyspnea in Ferrets

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Quiz 

Best Practices: Cytodiagnosis in Exotic Pet Practice Post Test

Take the test for R.A.C.E. approved credit . . .

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Le site Lafervet.com est conçu pour une utilisation par les vétérinaires. Il est ouvert aux vétérinaires diplômés, aux techniciens […]

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Quality Exotic Small Mammal Anesthesia Post Test

Quality Exotic Small Mammal Anesthesia was reviewed and approved by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB) Registry of Approved Continuing Education (R.A.C.E.) program for 1 hour of continuing education, in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB R.A.C.E. approval….

Article  Video  Webinar 

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Article  Quiz  Slideshow 

Rabbit Anatomy Basics Slideshow

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Article  Slideshow 

Rabbit Breed Basics Slideshow

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Client Education Handout 

Basic Rabbit Care Handout and Infographic

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Sugar Glider Disease Update: “Ick”

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Article  Presenting Problem 

Presenting problem: Pouch Infection and Mastitis in Sugar Gliders

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Article  Presenting Problem 

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Nutritional Support to the Critical Exotic Patient

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ExoticsCon 2015

Lafeber Company was proud to serve as THE platinum sponsor of ExoticsCon 2015. Join us in Portland in 2016 for the next Joint Conference of the Association of Avian Veterinarians, Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians, and Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians.

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Client Education Handout 

Bloat and Gastrointestinal Blockage in Rabbits Client Handout

Gastrointestinal obstruction and a stomach distended with gas and fluid or “bloat” is a serious health problem of pet rabbits. Use this client educational handout to answer owner questions: What causes bloat and obstruction? Why is bloat a serious condition? What does bloat look like in the rabbit? This handout also explains the basics of a diagnostic workup, treatment, follow-up care, and prevention for this critical condition.

Article  Case Study  Slideshow 

Case Challenge: A 5-Year-Old Rabbit With Anorexia and Lethargy

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Article  Information sheet 

Basic Information Sheet: European Hedgehog

The European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) is one of the most common species seen in wildlife rehabilitation in western Europe. Hedgehogs are potential carriers of zoonotic disease. Ringworm infection caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes is the most commonly contracted zoonosis of wildlife rehabilitators in the United Kingdom. Other important medical conditions include ectoparasites infestations, gastrointestinal disease caused by Salmonella enteritidits or coccidiosis as well as bronchopneumonia associated with bacterial and/or lungworm infection.

Use our European hedgehog Information Sheet to review taxonomy, conservation status, physical description, diet and housing needs, anatomy and physiology, preventive care as well as important medical conditions. Login to view information sheet references.