Article  Case Study  Quiz  Video  Webinar 

Small Mammal Imaging and Radiographic Cases

This RACE-approved, non-interactive webinar recording presented by Natalie Antinoff, DVM, DABVP (Avian Practice) explores radiography and sonography of exotic companion mammals. Topics covered include restraint and positioning, normal radiographic anatomy of ferrets, rabbits, and popular rodent species, as well as unique anatomic features of the sugar glider and hedgehog. Common pathologic conditions as well as typical radiographic findings are also explored, and case examples are used to emphasize key concepts.

Article 

A Necropsy Guide to Serpentes

The postmortem exam is a key diagnostic tool in understanding the reasons for a snake’s morbidity and mortality. Necropsies can provide valuable information to provide a risk assessment for other animals in a population or collection and can help provide closure for a grieving owner. This manuscript reviews the snake necropsy in a systemic, thorough manner, describing normal anatomy and proper collection technique from head to tail.

Article 

Adrenocortical Disease in Ferrets

Hyperadrenocorticism is a common and complex clinical condition in the pet ferret. This disease occurs most frequently in ferrets three years or older but has been reported in animals as young as one year of age. Presumptive diagnosis of adrenal disease in the ferret is based on history, clinical signs, imaging diagnostics, and steroid hormone analysis. Medical therapy using deslorelin implants, though not curative, is recommended. Ferrets may remain asymptomatic for a median of 1-1.5 years. Adrenalectomy may be indicated in case non-responsiveness to medical treatment, although adrenalectomy of the right adrenal gland is difficult.

Article  Presenting Problem 

Presenting problem: Urethral Obstruction in the Ferret

Urethral obstruction is an important reason for emergency presentation of the male ferret. If not corrected, obstruction can result in severe metabolic disturbances, coma, and death.

Signs of complete urethral obstruction are usually not very subtle. Ferrets may strain violently or cry when attempting to urinate. Owners may misinterpret the straining observed as “constipation”, and tenesmus may even lead to diarrhea in some cases. Occasionally, a ferret with blockage will present for lethargy, weakness, anorexia, and even collapse without obvious signs of dysuria although the urinary bladder will be…

Client Education Handout 

Adrenal Disease in the Ferret

Adrenocortical disease is a common endocrine disorder in middle-aged to older ferrets. This client education handout answers several questions for the ferret owner:  What is the adrenal gland? What causes adrenocortical disease? What are the clinical signs of adrenal disease? How can adrenal disease be diagnosed and treated? And finally, why should I treat adrenal disease?